Paul Kingsnorth

Masthead and all the other great pictures are by Alan 'Baggelboy' Rogerson.

My second collection of poetry, Songs from the Blue River, is out now.  It’s a collection which gives voice to oak trees, earthworms, starlings, salmon, lakes and glaciers; and a few humans too. Find out more.

 

I use my mailing list a few times a year to update people about my forthcoming books, events and other such things. It’s simple, confidential and free of adverts.

  • The Great Work Essays | 18 November 2018 One night, many years ago, I was visited in a dream by a figure I had never seen before and do not want to see again. Back then I rarely remembered my dreams, but I remembered this one. More than a decade on, it is still vivid. the clouds is blaec torrs and around these…
  • A Sharon Blackie podcast Film & Audio | 11 August 2018 A conversation with writer and mythologist Sharon Blackie about place, belonging, not belonging, writing and strange old stories. The Hedge School Podcast: Paul Kingsnorth  
  • The Circling Essays | 1 August 2018 I am 20,000 words into my novel and something is missing. Perhaps not missing; perhaps not quite birthed. Some edge remains unstropped, something waits to be brought to fruition. How to bring it? How to walk into the space where it can be found? Any writer will tell you of the importance of losing control.…
  • Destroying Angel Short stories | 24 June 2018 There were four people in the church for morning prayer. Four people, all over sixty. One of them asleep. I always applaud the vicar, at the end. Every church I go to, I applaud the vicar. Sometimes I approach him afterwards and I say, it’s a hard job you have, vicar. Somebody should tell them,…
  • A Storm Blown from Paradise Essays | 8 June 2018 Not far from where I live in the west of Ireland is the former home of the country’s greatest modern poet, William Butler Yeats. Thoor Ballylee, an old Norman tower attached to a low thatched cottage, is set in a quiet river valley which seems to have remained curiously untouched even as the development boom…
  • Folk Reviews | 17 March 2018 I’ll put up my hands and make an admission: I don’t read many contemporary novels. Most of them seem, well, too contemporary. For a long time, much ‘literary’ fiction has skated along the surface of modern urban life, engaging with the ‘interiority’ of the middle class mind and whatever cultural brouhaha is currently in fashion…

Much, much more writing can be found here filed under essays, reports, interviews, poetry and books.